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Morning Muster: 1/8/2015

Sailors aboard the Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry prepare the ship’s forecastle for an eastbound transit of the Strait of Gibraltar. Fort McHenry, part of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group, is conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Adam Austin)

Sailors aboard the Whidbey Island-class amphibious dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry prepare the ship’s forecastle for an eastbound transit of the Strait of Gibraltar. Fort McHenry, part of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group, is conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Adam Austin)

VA doc killed in El Paso left private practice to help vets; Clay Hunt suicide bill reintroduced in House; Vietnam vet on death row claims PTSD; West Point professor says incentives, not disability checks; vets still fighting for environmental-exposure connection; Hep C pill costs DoD, VA millions; Kennedy Center hosts Lincoln Awards for vets; El Paso shooting brings out frustrations; drug trial for glioblastoma shows promise

The VA psychologist killed Tuesday in the El Paso attack had left a successful private practice after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to help soldiers returning from the battlefield, reports the El Paso TimesAaron Martinez. Timothy Fjordbak, 63, was killed by an Iraqi War veteran, Jerry Serrato, 48, who had worked for the clinic in the past, FBI officials said. Serrato had also threatened the doctor in the past, Martinez and Daniel Borundo report.

The Clay Hunt veterans suicide prevention bill has been reintroduced in the House and is expected to show up in Congress soon, reports Stars & StripesTravis Tritten. Representatives Jeff Miller, R-Florida; Tim Walz, D-Minnesota; and Tammy Duckworth, D-Illionois, co-sponsored the bill, which was blocked in the last session of Congress by a lone senator: Tom Coburn, R-Oklahoma.

A Vietnam veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder on death row is fighting for clemency based on his wartime experiences, reports USA TODAY‘s Gregg Zoroya. “Research shows that violence typically does not occur among those with PTSD, though combat veterans may be a greater risk for this kind of reaction,” Zoroya is careful to note. “The illness can lead to bouts of anger and aggression.”

A West Point professor who lost a leg in Iraq is fighting to create incentives for disabled vets, rather than disability checks, so they return to work or start their own businesses, reports The New York TimesDave Philipps. The idea is controversial, he reports, because not all veterans are equipped to work and because the professor is a fiscal conservative. Others say it’s part of a move to look at veterans as capable, successful members of society who, even with disabilities, have skills that can be applied to civilian life.

Veterans continue to fight to show their neurological and respiratory ailments are due to environmental exposures, such as the burn pits, in Iraq and Afghanistan, reports KHI News Service‘s Andy Marso.

A $1,000-a-pop Hepatitis C pill is costing the military and VA millions, reports Military TimesPatricia Kime.

The Kennedy Center hosted the first Lincoln Awards last night, an event sponsored by the Friars Club that honors people who have helped vets, reports The Associated Press‘s Brett Zongker. The event will be aired on PBS. Jerry Lewis made an appearance, announcing that he was 89 years old and he still hoped to raise more money for veterans than he had for Jerry’s Kids. Nick JonasGavin DeGraw and Aloe Blacc were hits with the crowd of 1,900 vets.

The El Paso VA shooting Tuesday brought out frustrations between VA staff and veterans on a Facebook page, reports the Washington Post‘s Dan Lamothe.

A drug trial for a form of brain cancer sometimes found in Vietnam war veterans exposed to Agent Orange has shown promise, sending its stock soaring, reports Bidness Etc‘s Hannah Ishmael. The company developing the drug,CytRx, said aldoxorubicin seems to be effective in stopping growth of glioblostoma tumors, and possibly shrinking them. However, there is a partial-hold on the medication after a patient died during treatment. Bergmann & Moore has expertise in Agent Orange-related glioblastoma cases.

Bergmann & Moore, LLC, is a national law firm dedicated to serving the needs of veterans in compensation claims before and against the Department of Veterans Affairs. The firm’s partners are former VA attorneys who are very familiar with the VA system. Bergmann & Moore handles all kinds of cases, but has a concentration in claims involving PTSD, military sexual trauma and complex medical issues, such as brain cancer or degenerative issues, veterans exposed to Agent Orange often face. For more information, to submit news or to sign up for an email version of this blog, contact Kelly Kennedy at kkennedy@vetlawyers.com

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