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Morning Muster: 12/11/2014

First Lady Michelle Obama introduces her new helper, President Barack Obama, at an event supporting the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, D.C. Wednesday. (DoD News photo by EJ Hersom)

First Lady Michelle Obama introduces her new helper, President Barack Obama, at an event supporting the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, D.C. Wednesday. (DoD News photo by EJ Hersom)

VA releases vets’ employment report; CBO report compares civilian, VA medical costs; soldiers in WTUs still face harassment; government has 13 months to end vets’ homelessness; researchers looking at blast effects on SEAL brains; VA secretary wants no wait times for mental health care; male service members don’t tend to report sexual assault; House bill would deport service members’ undocumented families

The Department of Veterans Affairs just released a “special report” documenting veterans’ employment from 2000 to 2013. Rates are broken down by age, gender and service.

The Congressional Budget Office released a report comparing civilian medical costs to VA health costs. They conclude that it’s hard to make a conclusion: VA drugs and doctor costs are lower, but otherwise, it’s hard to tell.

Soldiers in Warrior Transition Units—units created for people whose injuries make it difficult to perform their regular duties or who will likely be processed out with a medical retirement—still face harassment and hazing by cadre, report Dallas Morning News reporters Dave Tarrant, Scott Friedman and Eva Parks. Now, the VFW and IAVA say the Congress and Pentagon need to do more.

The government has 13 months to end veterans‘ homelessness to meet its goal, reports WNPR‘s Lucy Nalpathanchil. In Connecticut, they’re seeing both Vietnam-era vets and veterans of recent wars in the streets.

Researchers will look at how repeated blasts affect Navy SEALs’ brains, reports U-T San Diego‘s Jeanette Steele. The Veterans Research Alliance hopes to see how neural connections are broken down by explosions. The results could also help civilians, such as football players, with head injuries.

VA Secretary Bob McDonald says he wants no wait times for mental health care, reports The Associated Press‘s Kathleen Foody. With 22 veterans killing themselves every day, often citing that they couldn’t get care, that seems like a good idea.

Male military sexual trauma victims take longer to report assaults, reports The Associated Press‘s Lolita C. Baldor. About 1 percent of male service members have “experienced unwanted sexual contact,” compared to 4.3 percent of women, according to an anonymous survey. That’s about 10,500 men and 8,500 women, but only 14 percent of reported assaults come from men.

Military.com‘s Bryant Jordan reports service members’ undocumented family members would be deported under a Republican-backed bill in the House.

Bergmann & Moore, LLC, is a national law firm dedicated to serving the needs of veterans in compensation claims before and against the Department of Veterans Affairs. The firm’s partners are former VA attorneys who are very familiar with the VA system. Bergmann & Moore handles all kinds of cases, but has a concentration in claims involving PTSD, military sexual trauma and complex medical issues, such as brain cancer or degenerative issues, veterans exposed to Agent Orange often face. For more information, or to sign up for an email version of this blog, contact Kelly Kennedy at kkennedy@vetlawyers.com.

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