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Morning Muster: 11/4/2014

U.S. Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 2d Marine Regiment, greet a member of the Afghanistan National Army as he takes his post at Camp Leatherneck, Helmand province, Afghanistan, last week. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. John A. Martinez Jr.)

U.S. Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, greet a member of the Afghanistan National Army as he takes his post at Camp Leatherneck, Helmand province, Afghanistan, last week. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. John A. Martinez Jr.)

Stripes looks at reintegration tragedies; Military Times offers vet-based election coverage; vets signing over benefits for fast cash; it’s National Veterans Small Business Week

Stars & Stripes has begun looking at the problems—often deadly—service members face as they reintegrate after they return home from Afghanistan and Iraq. The first in the “Casualties of the After War” series, written by Martin Kuz, features the story of Army Sgt. Isaac Sims. Sims’ PTSD left him crippled, and his story ends in a garage filled with police bullets.

Kuz couches his story with assurances that most veterans are not violent, but he also makes sure blame is placed where it needs to be: “But Sims’ death and similar confrontations, some in which officers have been shot, expose how delays in VA care increase the potential for risk and magnify the need for specialized police training to handle veterans in crisis.”

It’s a tough read, as the rest of the series will likely be, but it also offers hope in solutions.

Military Times has offered up elections coverage that focuses on races key to veterans’ issues, such as the House and Senate veterans’ affairs committees, as well as veterans running for office. The group, which includes the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force Times papers, is owned by Gannett—rather than the Defense Department—and their coverage, from Leo ShaneIII, includes polls from the troops and ballot issues important to veterans.

Federal auditors are concerned that loan companies that promise quick cash in exchange for a veteran signing over monthly benefits may be taking advantage of unclear rules and veterans behind on bills, reports U-T San Diego’s Joel Hoffmann. One Marine Corps vet is leading a class-action lawsuit against the practice.

The Government Accountability Office found that unclear, sometimes concealed interest rates are higher than regulated rates from banks and other loan companies, Hoffmann reports.

 It’s National Veterans Small Business Week, reports the Small Business Administration, and First Lady Michelle Obama will appear on ABC’s “Shark Tank” Friday to highlight veterans’ business ideas. The government will also host several events to help vets get started, such as Boots to Business training in Stuttgart, Germany, and a seminar on veterans’ access to capital in Washington, DC.

Bergmann & Moore, LLC, is a national law firm dedicated to serving the needs of veterans in compensation claims before and against the Department of Veterans Affairs. For more information, contact Kelly Kennedy at kkennedy@vetlawyers.com.

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